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Title: All That’s Happening behind the Scenes: Putting the Spotlight on Volunteer Moderator Labor in Reddit
Online volunteers are an uncompensated yet valuable labor force for many social platforms. For example, volunteer content moderators perform a vast amount of labor to maintain online communities. However, as social platforms like Reddit favor revenue generation and user engagement, moderators are under-supported to manage the expansion of online communities. To preserve these online communities, developers and researchers of social platforms must account for and support as much of this labor as possible. In this paper, we quantitatively characterize the publicly visible and invisible actions taken by moderators on Reddit, using a unique dataset of private moderator logs for 126 subreddits and over 900 moderators. Our analysis of this dataset reveals the heterogeneity of moderation work across both communities and moderators. Moreover, we find that analyzing only visible work – the dominant way that moderation work has been studied thus far – drastically underestimates the amount of human moderation labor on a subreddit. We discuss the implications of our results on content moderation research and social platforms.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1815507
NSF-PAR ID:
10404664
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media
Volume:
16
ISSN:
2162-3449
Page Range / eLocation ID:
584 to 595
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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