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Title: Enhancer activation via TCP and HD-ZIP and repression by Dof transcription factors mediate giant cell-specific expression
Abstract Proper cell-type identity relies on highly coordinated regulation of gene expression. Regulatory elements such as enhancers can produce cell type-specific expression patterns, but the mechanisms underlying specificity are not well understood. We previously identified an enhancer region capable of driving specific expression in giant cells, which are large, highly endoreduplicated cells in the Arabidopsis thaliana sepal epidermis. In this study, we use the giant cell enhancer as a model to understand the regulatory logic that promotes cell type-specific expression. Our dissection of the enhancer revealed that giant cell specificity is mediated primarily through the combination of two activators and one repressor. HD-ZIP and TCP transcription factors are involved in the activation of expression throughout the epidermis. High expression of HD-ZIP transcription factor genes in giant cells promoted higher expression driven by the enhancer in giant cells. Dof transcription factors repressed the activity of the enhancer such that only giant cells maintained enhancer activity. Thus, our data are consistent with a conceptual model whereby cell type-specific expression emerges from the combined activities of three transcription factor families activating and repressing expression in epidermal cells.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1553030
NSF-PAR ID:
10405470
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The Plant Cell
ISSN:
1040-4651
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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