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Title: Utilizing Smartphones for Approachable IoT Education in K-12
Distributed computing, computer networking, and the Internet of Things (IoT) are all around us, yet only computer science and engineering majors learn the technologies that enable our modern lives. This paper introduces PhoneIoT, a mobile app that makes it possible to teach some of the basic concepts of distributed computation and networked sensing to novices. PhoneIoT turns mobile phones and tablets into IoT devices and makes it possible to create highly engaging projects through NetsBlox, an open-source block-based programming environment focused on teaching distributed computing at the high school level. PhoneIoT lets NetsBlox programs—running in the browser on the student’s computer—access available sensors. Since phones have touchscreens, PhoneIoT also allows building a Graphical User Interface (GUI) remotely from NetsBlox, which can be set to trigger custom code written by the student via NetsBlox’s message system. This approach enables students to create quite advanced distributed projects, such as turning their phone into a game controller or tracking their exercise on top of an interactive Google Maps background with just a few blocks of code.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1949472
NSF-PAR ID:
10408423
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Sensors
Volume:
22
Issue:
24
ISSN:
1424-8220
Page Range / eLocation ID:
9778
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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