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Title: Toward Plant Cyborgs: Hydrogels Incorporated onto Plant Tissues Enable Programmable Shape Control
Award ID(s):
2011924
NSF-PAR ID:
10413510
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
ACS Macro Letters
Volume:
11
Issue:
8
ISSN:
2161-1653
Page Range / eLocation ID:
961 to 966
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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