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Title: Inconsistent Matters: A Knowledge-Guided Dual-Consistency Network for Multi-Modal Rumor Detection
Rumor spreaders are increasingly utilizing multimedia content to attract the attention and trust of news consumers. Though quite a few rumor detection models have exploited the multi-modal data, they seldom consider the inconsistent semantics between images and texts, and rarely spot the inconsistency among the post contents and background knowledge. In addition, they commonly assume the completeness of multiple modalities and thus are incapable of handling handle missing modalities in real-life scenarios. Motivated by the intuition that rumors in social media are more likely to have inconsistent semantics, a novel Knowledge-guided Dual-consistency Network is proposed to detect rumors with multimedia contents. It uses two consistency detection subnetworks to capture the inconsistency at the cross-modal level and the content-knowledge level simultaneously. It also enables robust multi-modal representation learning under different missing visual modality conditions, using a special token to discriminate between posts with visual modality and posts without visual modality. Extensive experiments on three public real-world multimedia datasets demonstrate that our framework can outperform the state- of-the-art baselines under both complete and incomplete modality conditions.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1909879 1931042 2008155 2145922
NSF-PAR ID:
10417976
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
IEEE transactions on knowledge and data engineering
ISSN:
2326-3865
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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