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Title: Methane and Carbon Dioxide Fluxes in a Temperate Tidal Salt Marsh: Comparisons Between Plot and Ecosystem Measurements
Abstract

Tidal wetlands are comprised of complex interdependent pathways where measurements of carbon exchange are often scale dependent. Common data collection methods (i.e., chambers and eddy covariance) are inherently constrained to different spatial and temporal scales which could generate biased information for applications of carbon accounting, identifying functional relationships and predicting future responses to climate change. Consequently, it is needed to systematically evaluate measurements derived from multiple approaches to identify differences and how techniques complement each other to reconcile interpretations. To accomplish this, we tested ecosystem‐scale eddy covariance with plot‐scale chamber measurements within a temperate salt marsh. We found good agreement (R2 = 0.71–0.95) when comparing measurements of CH4emissions and CO2exchange but this agreement was dependent upon canopy phenology with discrepancies mainly arising during senescence and dormancy phenophases. The environmental drivers for CH4and CO2fluxes were mostly preserved across different measurement techniques, but the number of drivers increases while their individual strength decreases at the ecosystem scale. Empirical upscaling models parameterized with chamber measurements overestimated annual net ecosystem exchange (NEE; 108%) and gross primary production (GPP; 12%) while underestimating ecosystem respiration (Reco; 14%) and CH4emissions (69%) compared to eddy covariance measurements. Our results suggest that the environmental complexity of CH4and CO2fluxes in salt marshes may be underestimated by chamber‐based measurements, and highlights how different techniques are complementary while considering limitations at each level of measurement.

 
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Award ID(s):
1652594 1757353
NSF-PAR ID:
10418090
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  
Publisher / Repository:
DOI PREFIX: 10.1029
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences
Volume:
127
Issue:
7
ISSN:
2169-8953
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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    Trifunovic, B., Vázquez‐Lule, A., Capooci, M., Seyfferth, A. L., Moffat, C., & Vargas, R. (2020). Carbon dioxide and methane emissions from a temperate salt marsh tidal creek. Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, 125, e2019JG005558. https://doi.org/ 10.1029/2019JG005558


     
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