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Title: National Science Foundation ATE Grant Funding and Mentoring Opportunities
The National Science Foundation Advanced Technological Education (NSF-ATE) program has grant funding opportunities available to support CTE and STEM technician program development. NSF-ATE grant funding opportunities are intended to help educators develop or improve their 2-year technician programs. Proposals may focus on program, curriculum, and educational materials development, program improvement, faculty professional development, teacher preparation, career pathways, outreach activities, undergraduate research experiences, internships, apprenticeships, and more. Partnerships with universities, colleges, and 7-12 institutions in support of workforce development are encouraged. Industry partnerships are essential for NSF-ATE projects. NSF-ATE supports Emerging Technologies and technologies such as Biotechnology, Engineering, Energy, Environmental, Agricultural, Advanced Manufacturing, Micro/Nano Technologies, Information, Security, and Geospatial. Multiple categories of NSF-ATE grant funding are available including Projects, Small Projects for Institutions New to ATE, Applied Research on Technician Education, National Centers, and Resource Centers. The new NSF-ATE solicitation (NSF 21-598) was released in 2021 and includes higher funding levels and multiple categories of grant funding opportunities, including a new Consortia for Innovations in Technician Education. NSF-ATE has some helpful resources for educators planning to develop or improve their courses or programs. Mentoring opportunities for grant proposal development are available through multiple projects such as Mentor-Connect, MNT-EC (Micro Nano Technology Education Center), Mentor Up, Project Vision, Pathways to Innovation, CCPISTEM, and FORCCE-ATE. Each of these projects has a unique approach and a different focus to help their mentees successfully submit NSF-ATE grant proposals.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2000281
NSF-PAR ID:
10418236
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Date Published:
Journal Name:
America Association of Engineering Education
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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