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Title: Net Primary Productivity (NPP) Weight Data at the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico
Several long-term studies at the Sevilleta LTER measure net primary production (NPP) across ecosystems and treatments. Net primary production is a fundamental ecological variable that quantifies rates of carbon consumption and fixation. Estimates of NPP are important in understanding energy flow at a community level as well as spatial and temporal responses to a range of ecological processes. Above-ground net primary production (ANPP) is the change in plant biomass, including loss to death and decomposition, over a given period of time. To measure this change, vegetation variables, including species composition and the cover and height of individuals, are sampled up to three times yearly (winter, spring, and fall) at permanent plots within a study site. The weight data presented here is obtained by harvesting a series of covers for species observed during plot sampling. These species are always harvested from habitat comparable to the plots in which they were recorded. This data is then used to make volumetric measurements of species and build regressions correlating biomass and volume. From these calculations, seasonal biomass and seasonal and annual NPP are determined.    more » « less
Award ID(s):
1655499
NSF-PAR ID:
10424128
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Publisher / Repository:
Environmental Data Initiative
Date Published:
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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