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This content will become publicly available on May 28, 2024

Title: Flying SD Cards, Aerial Repeaters, & Homebrew Apps: Emergent Use of Technologies for Collaboration in Search and Rescue
Search and rescue (SAR) teams are the first to respond to emergencies. This could include finding lost hikers, shoring buildings, or aiding people post-disaster. SAR combines orienteering, engineering, field medicine, and communication. Technology use in SAR has been changing with the proliferation of information communication technologies; so, we ask, how are established and emerging technologies used in SAR? Understanding how responders are adopting and adapting these technologies during SAR missions can inform future design and improve outcomes for SAR teams. We interviewed SAR volunteers to contextualize their experiences with technology and triangulated with additional questionnaire data. We discuss how technology use in SAR requires an intersection of expert knowledge and creative problem solving to overcome challenges in the field. This research contributes an understanding of the constraints on and implications for future SAR technologies and SAR operators’ creativity in emergent situations.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2106380 1651532
NSF-PAR ID:
10426221
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Editor(s):
Radianti, J.; Dokas, I.; LaLone, N.; Khazanchi, D.
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 20th ISCRAM Conference
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1014-1032
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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