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This content will become publicly available on September 1, 2024

Title: Recent advances in wearable sensors and data analytics for continuous monitoring and analysis of biomarkers and symptoms related to COVID-19
The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the lives of many people around the world. Based on the available data and published reports, most people diagnosed with COVID-19 exhibit no or mild symptoms and could be discharged home for self-isolation. Considering that a substantial portion of them will progress to a severe disease requiring hospitalization and medical management, including respiratory and circulatory support in the form of supplemental oxygen therapy, mechanical ventilation, vasopressors, etc. The continuous monitoring of patient conditions at home for patients with COVID-19 will allow early determination of disease severity and medical intervention to reduce morbidity and mortality. In addition, this will allow early and safe hospital discharge and free hospital beds for patients who are in need of admission. In this review, we focus on the recent developments in next-generation wearable sensors capable of continuous monitoring of disease symptoms, particularly those associated with COVID-19. These include wearable non/minimally invasive biophysical (temperature, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, heart rate, and heart rate variability) and biochemical (cytokines, cortisol, and electrolytes) sensors, sensor data analytics, and machine learning-enabled early detection and medical intervention techniques. Together, we aim to inspire the future development of wearable sensors integrated with data analytics, which serve as a foundation for disease diagnostics, health monitoring and predictions, and medical interventions.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2113736
NSF-PAR ID:
10433388
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Biophysics Reviews
Volume:
4
Issue:
3
ISSN:
2688-4089
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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