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Title: Tetrathiafulvalene-2,3,6,7-tetrathiolate linker redox-state elucidation via S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy
Sulfur K-edge XAS data provide a unique tool to examine oxidation states and covalency in electronically complex S-based ligands. We present sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy on a discrete redox-series of Ni-based tetrathiafulvalene tetrathiolate (TTFtt) complexes as well as on a 1D coordination polymer (CP), NiTTFtt. Experiment and theory suggest that Ni–S covalency decreases with oxidation which has implications for charge transport pathways.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1943452
NSF-PAR ID:
10435696
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Chemical Communications
ISSN:
1359-7345
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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