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Title: Quantifying quality: The impact of measures of school quality on children's academic achievement across diverse societies
Abstract RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS

We examined the extent to which four measures of school quality were associated with one another, and whether they predicted children's academic achievement in 10 culturally and geographically diverse societies.

Across populations, measures related to classroom experience and composition were correlated with one another as were measures of access to educational resources to classroom experience and composition.

Age, the number of teachers per class, and access to writing materials were key predictors of academic achievement across populations.

Our data have implications for designing efficacious educational initiatives to improve school quality globally.

 
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Award ID(s):
2114731
NSF-PAR ID:
10441351
Author(s) / Creator(s):
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Publisher / Repository:
Wiley-Blackwell
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Developmental Science
ISSN:
1363-755X
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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