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Title: Polymer Lung Surfactants Attenuate Direct Lung Injury in Mice
Award ID(s):
2211843
NSF-PAR ID:
10448607
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering
Volume:
9
Issue:
5
ISSN:
2373-9878
Page Range / eLocation ID:
2716 to 2730
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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