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Title: Multiple beam coherent combination via an optical ring resonator

Future gravitational wave detectors (GWDs) require low noise, single frequency, continuous wave lasers with excellent beam quality and powers in excess of 500 W. Low noise laser amplifiers with high spatial purity have been demonstrated up to 300 W. For higher powers, coherent beam combination can overcome scaling limitations. In this Letter we introduce a new, to the best of our knowledge, combination scheme that uses a bow-tie resonator to combine three laser beams with simultaneous spatial filtering performance.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10452893
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Optical Society of America
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Optics Letters
Volume:
48
Issue:
17
ISSN:
0146-9592; OPLEDP
Page Range / eLocation ID:
Article No. 4717
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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