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Title: Real‐Time Monitoring of Bacteria Clearance From Blood in a Murine Model
Abstract

Bloodstream infections, especially those that are antibiotic resistant, pose a significant challenge to health care leading to increased hospitalization time and patient mortality. There are different facets to this problem that make these diseases difficult to treat, such as the difficulty to detect bacteria in the blood and the poorly understood mechanism of bacterial invasion into and out of the circulatory system. However, little progress has been made in developing techniques to study bacteria dynamics in the bloodstream. Here, we present a new approach using anin vivoflow cytometry platform for real‐time, noninvasive, label‐free, and quantitative monitoring of the lifespan of green fluorescent protein‐expressingStaphylococcus aureusandPseudomonas aeruginosain a murine model. We report a relatively fast average rate of clearance forS. aureus(k= 0.37 ± 0.09 min−1, half‐life ~1.9 min) and a slower rate forP. aeruginosa(k= 0.07 ± 0.02 min−1, half‐life ~9.6 min). We also observed what appears to be two stages of clearance forS. aureus, whileP. aeruginosaappeared only to have a single stage of clearance. Our results demonstrate that an advanced research tool can be used for studying the dynamics of bacteria cells directly in the bloodstream, providing insight into the progression of infectious diseases in circulation. © 2019 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10457034
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Cytometry Part A
Volume:
97
Issue:
7
ISSN:
1552-4922
Page Range / eLocation ID:
p. 706-712
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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