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Title: Surface‐initiated PET‐RAFT polymerization under metal‐free and ambient conditions using enzyme degassing
ABSTRACT

An open‐to‐air method for the efficient synthesis of surface‐tethered polymer brushes based on photoinduced electron transfer‐reversible addition‐fragmentation chain transfer (PET‐RAFT) polymerization is reported. Key to this approach is an enzyme‐assisted strategy using glucose oxidase to facilitate thein situremoval of oxygen during the polymerization process. Control experiments in the absence of glucose oxidase confirm the importance of enzymatic deoxygenation for successful polymerization of a variety of acrylamide, methacrylate, and acrylate monomers. In accordance with controlled polymerization kinetics, a linear increase in brush height as a function of irradiation time for a range of light intensities is demonstrated. Importantly, the use of light to mediate growth and the inherent monomer versatility of PET‐RAFT allow for the facile fabrication of well‐defined polymer brushes under aqueous conditions. © 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci.2020,58, 70–76

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10457554
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Polymer Science
Volume:
58
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2642-4150
Page Range / eLocation ID:
p. 70-76
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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    Basic Protocol 1: Synthesis of the azide derivatives of chain transfer agent and radical initiator

    Basic Protocol 2: Installation of an azide group on the α‐end of RAFT polymers

    Alternate Protocol: Installation of an azide group on the ω‐end of RAFT polymers

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