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Title: Repurposing Iron‐ and 2‐Oxoglutarate‐Dependent Oxygenases to Catalyze Olefin Hydration
Abstract

Mononuclear nonheme iron(II) and 2‐oxoglutarate (Fe/2OG)‐dependent oxygenases and halogenases are known to catalyze a diverse set of oxidative reactions, including hydroxylation, halogenation, epoxidation, and desaturation in primary metabolism and natural product maturation. However, their use in abiotic transformations has mainly been limited to C−H oxidation. Herein, we show that various enzymes of this family, when reconstituted with Fe(II) or Fe(III), can catalyze Mukaiyama hydration—a redox neutral transformation. Distinct from the native reactions of the Fe/2OG enzymes, wherein oxygen atom transfer (OAT) catalyzed by an iron‐oxo species is involved, this nonnative transformation proceeds through a hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) pathway in a 2OG‐independent manner. Additionally, in contrast to conventional inorganic catalysts, wherein a dinuclear iron species is responsible for HAT, the Fe/2OG enzymes exploit a mononuclear iron center to support this reaction. Collectively, our work demonstrates that Fe/2OG enzymes have utility in catalysis beyond the current scope of catalytic oxidation.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10458315
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Angewandte Chemie
Volume:
135
Issue:
41
ISSN:
0044-8249
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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