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Title: Large Power Amplification in Magneto‐Mechano‐Electric Harvesters through Distributed Forcing
Abstract

Energy harvesting from extremely low frequency magnetic fields using magneto‐mechano‐electric (MME) harvesters enables wireless power transfer for operating Internet of Things (IoT) devices. The MME harvesters are designed to resonate at a fixed frequency by absorbing AC magnetic fields through a composite cantilever comprising of piezoelectric and magnetostrictive materials, and a permanent magnetic tip mass. However, this harvester architecture limits power generation because volume of the magnetic end mass is closely coupled with the resonance frequency of the device structure. Here, a method is demonstrated for maintaining the resonance frequency of the MME harvesters under all operating conditions (e.g., 60 Hz, standard frequency of electricity in many countries) while simultaneously enhancing the output power generation. By distributing the magnetic mass over the beam, the output power of the harvester is significantly enhanced at a constant resonance frequency. The MME harvester with distributed forcing shows 280% improvement in the power generation compared with a traditional architecture. The generated power is shown to be sufficient to power eight different onboard sensors with wireless data transmission integrated on a drone. These results demonstrate the promise of MME energy harvesters for powering wireless communication and IoT sensors.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10458782
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Advanced Energy Materials
Volume:
10
Issue:
8
ISSN:
1614-6832
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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