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Title: Social Connectedness Resource Preferences of Older Adults in Assisted Living: A Scoping Review Based on the WHO-ICF Framework
The current scoping review identified emerging evidence on social connectedness resource preferences of older adults in assisted living facilities (ALFs) and the community. A literature search was performed using several databases. We included review articles published between January 2000 and September 2022 in English and related to social connectedness resources in ALFs and the community. Of 134 titles and abstracts, eight studies were included. Study participants comprised 2,482 older adults from 233 ALFs in the United States. Themes were framed using the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. For social activities, older adults preferred facility-based recreation and leisure resources. For community social connectedness, residents preferred participation in civic life activities. Participants of older age preferred facility resources, whereas those of younger age preferred more demanding physical activities. Those from larger enrollment facilities preferred facility-based resources compared to community resources. For moderately and less active residents, participation was limited to less demanding activities. Older adults' preferences varied based on age, physical limitations, and size and location of the facility. Findings suggest opportunities for further research on developing ALF- and community-based resources for older adults' social well-being and quality of life. [ Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 49 (9), 35–42.]  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1924112
NSF-PAR ID:
10460981
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Gerontological Nursing
Volume:
49
Issue:
9
ISSN:
0098-9134
Page Range / eLocation ID:
35 to 42
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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