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Title: Surveillance and the future of work: exploring employees’ attitudes toward monitoring in a post-COVID workplace
Abstract The future of work increasingly focuses on the collection and analysis of worker data to monitor communication, ensure productivity, reduce security threats, and assist in decision-making. The COVID-19 pandemic increased employer reliance on these technologies; however, the blurring of home and work boundaries meant these monitoring tools might also surveil private spaces. To explore workers’ attitudes toward increased monitoring practices, we present findings from a factorial vignette survey of 645 U.S. adults who worked from home during the early months of the pandemic. Using the theory of privacy as contextual integrity to guide the survey design and analysis, we unpack the types of workplace surveillance practices that violate privacy norms and consider attitudinal differences between male and female workers. Our findings highlight that the acceptability of workplace surveillance practices is highly contextual, and that reductions in privacy and autonomy at work may further exacerbate power imbalances, especially for vulnerable employees.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1704369
NSF-PAR ID:
10463681
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Editor(s):
Baym, Nancy; Ellison, Nicole
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication
Volume:
28
Issue:
4
ISSN:
1083-6101
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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