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Title: Snow Radar Echogram Layer Tracker: Deep Neural Networks for radar data from NASA Operation IceBridge
Award ID(s):
2308649 1838236
NSF-PAR ID:
10464855
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
2023 IEEE Radar Conference (RadarConf23)
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 6
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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