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Title: Multi-modal Interactive Perception in Human Control of Complex Objects
Tactile sensing has been increasingly utilized in robot control of unknown objects to infer physical properties and optimize manipulation. However, there is limited understanding about the contribution of different sensory modalities during interactive perception in complex interaction both in robots and in humans. This study investigated the effect of visual and haptic information on humans’ exploratory interactions with a ‘cup of coffee’, an object with nonlinear internal dynamics. Subjects were instructed to rhythmically transport a virtual cup with a rolling ball inside between two targets at a specified frequency, using a robotic interface. The cup and targets were displayed on a screen, and force feedback from the cup-andball dynamics was provided via the robotic manipulandum. Subjects were encouraged to explore and prepare the dynamics by “shaking” the cup-and-ball system to find the best initial conditions prior to the task. Two groups of subjects received the full haptic feedback about the cup-and-ball movement during the task; however, for one group the ball movement was visually occluded. Visual information about the ball movement had two distinctive effects on the performance: it reduced preparation time needed to understand the dynamics and, importantly, it led to simpler, more linear input-output interactions between hand and object. The results highlight how visual and haptic information regarding nonlinear internal dynamics have distinct roles for the interactive perception of complex objects.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1825942
NSF-PAR ID:
10465773
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA 2023),
Page Range / eLocation ID:
12500 to 12506
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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