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Title: Development of a lateral topographic weathering gradient in temperate forested podzols
Mineral weathering is an important soil-forming process driven by the interplay of water, organisms, solution chemistry, and mineralogy. The influence of hillslope-scale patterns of water flux on mineral weathering in soils is still not well understood, particularly in humid postglacial soils, which commonly harbor abundant weath- erable primary minerals. Previous work in these settings showed the importance of lateral hydrologic patterns to hillslope-scale pedogenesis. In this study, we hypothesized that there is a corresponding relationship between hydrologically driven pedogenesis and chemical weathering in podzols in the White Mountains of New Hamp- shire, USA. We tested this hypothesis by quantifying the depletion of plagioclase in the fine fraction (≤2 mm) of closely spaced, similar-age podzols along a gradient in topography and depth to bedrock that controls lateral water flow. Along this gradient, laterally developed podzols formed through frequent, episodic flushing by up- slope groundwater, and vertically developed podzols formed through characteristic vertical infiltration. We estimated the depletion of plagioclase-bound elements within the upper mineral horizons of podzols using mass transfer coefficients (τ) and quantified plagioclase losses directly through electron microscopy and microprobe analysis. Elemental depletion was significantly more pronounced in the upslope lateral eluvial (E horizon- dominant) podzols relative to lateral illuvial (B horizon-dominant) and vertical (containing both E and B hori- zons) podzols downslope, with median Na losses of ~74 %, ~56 %, and ~40 %, respectively. When comparing genetic E horizons, Na and Al were significantly more depleted in laterally developed podzols relative to vertically developed podzols. Microprobe analysis revealed that ~74 % of the plagioclase was weathered from the mineral pool of lateral eluvial podzols, compared to ~39 % and ~23 % for lateral illuvial podzols and vertically developed podzols, respectively. Despite this intense weathering, plagioclase remains the second most abundant mineral in soil thin sections. These findings confirm that the concept of soil development as occurring vertically does not accurately characterize soils in topographically complex regions. Our work improves the current understanding of pedogenesis by identifying distinct, short-scale gradients in mineral weathering shaped by local patterns of hydrology and topography.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1643327 1643415 1637685
NSF-PAR ID:
10472297
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Elsevier
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Geoderma
Volume:
439
Issue:
C
ISSN:
0016-7061
Page Range / eLocation ID:
116677
Subject(s) / Keyword(s):
Mineral weathering Hydropedology Podzolization Forest soils
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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