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Title: Spatiotemporal Heterogeneity and Intragenus Variability in Rhizobacterial Associations with Brassica rapa Growth

The rhizosphere, the zone of soil surrounding plant roots, is a hot spot for microbial activity, hosting bacteria capable of promoting plant growth in ways like increasing nutrient availability or fighting plant pathogens. This microbial system is highly diverse and most bacteria are unculturable, so to identify specific bacteria associated with plant growth, we used culture-independent community DNA sequencing combined with machine learning techniques.

 
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Award ID(s):
1655726
NSF-PAR ID:
10472514
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Editor(s):
Anderton, Christopher R.
Publisher / Repository:
American Society for Microbiology
Date Published:
Journal Name:
mSystems
Volume:
7
Issue:
3
ISSN:
2379-5077
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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