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Title: Baltimore Ecosystem Study: Denitrification potential in riparian zones and streams
Denitrification potential and a series of ancillary variables (inorganic nitrogen concentrations, moisture content, organic matter content, microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen content, potential net nitrogen mineralization and nitrification, microbial respiration, root biomass) has been measured in riparian zone soils and stream geomorphic features by a series of undergraduate and graduate student researchers as part of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study since the early 2000s. These studies often center on the series of sites where there has been long-term monitoring (since 2000) of riparian water tables and groundwater chemistry along four first or second order steams in and around the Gwynns Falls watershed in Baltimore City and County, MD (https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/f7721ec5a4fab5b031f8056824e07e7d). One site is in the completely forested Pond Branch catchment that serves as a "reference" study area for the Baltimore LTER (BES). Two sites (Glyndon, Gwynbrook) are in suburban areas of the watershed; one just upstream from the Glyndon BES long-term stream monitoring site in the headwaters of the Gwynns Falls, and one along a tributary that enters the Gwynns Falls just above the Gwynnbrook BES long-term stream monitoring site farther downstream. The final, urban site (Cahill) is along a tributary to the Gwynns Falls in Leakin Park in the urban core of the watershed. Other sites were used in different studies as described in the publications associated with each study. The different studies also varied in just which ancillary variables were measured.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1855277
NSF-PAR ID:
10474638
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Publisher / Repository:
Environmental Data Initiative
Date Published:
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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