skip to main content


Title: The Dimension of Divisibility Orders and Multiset Posets
Abstract

The Dushnik–Miller dimension of a posetPis the leastdfor whichPcan be embedded into a product ofdchains. Lewis and Souza isibility order on the interval of integers$$[N/\kappa , N]$$[N/κ,N]is bounded above by$$\kappa (\log \kappa )^{1+o(1)}$$κ(logκ)1+o(1)and below by$$\Omega ((\log \kappa /\log \log \kappa )^2)$$Ω((logκ/loglogκ)2). We improve the upper bound to$$O((\log \kappa )^3/(\log \log \kappa )^2).$$O((logκ)3/(loglogκ)2).We deduce this bound from a more general result on posets of multisets ordered by inclusion. We also consider other divisibility orders and give a bound for polynomials ordered by divisibility.

 
more » « less
NSF-PAR ID:
10475241
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Publisher / Repository:
Springer Science + Business Media
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Order
ISSN:
0167-8094
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
More Like this
  1. Abstract

    We study the structure of the Liouville quantum gravity (LQG) surfaces that are cut out as one explores a conformal loop-ensemble$$\hbox {CLE}_{\kappa '}$$CLEκfor$$\kappa '$$κin (4, 8) that is drawn on an independent$$\gamma $$γ-LQG surface for$$\gamma ^2=16/\kappa '$$γ2=16/κ. The results are similar in flavor to the ones from our companion paper dealing with$$\hbox {CLE}_{\kappa }$$CLEκfor$$\kappa $$κin (8/3, 4), where the loops of the CLE are disjoint and simple. In particular, we encode the combined structure of the LQG surface and the$$\hbox {CLE}_{\kappa '}$$CLEκin terms of stable growth-fragmentation trees or their variants, which also appear in the asymptotic study of peeling processes on decorated planar maps. This has consequences for questions that do a priori not involve LQG surfaces: In our paper entitled “CLE Percolations” described the law of interfaces obtained when coloring the loops of a$$\hbox {CLE}_{\kappa '}$$CLEκindependently into two colors with respective probabilitiespand$$1-p$$1-p. This description was complete up to one missing parameter$$\rho $$ρ. The results of the present paper about CLE on LQG allow us to determine its value in terms ofpand$$\kappa '$$κ. It shows in particular that$$\hbox {CLE}_{\kappa '}$$CLEκand$$\hbox {CLE}_{16/\kappa '}$$CLE16/κare related via a continuum analog of the Edwards-Sokal coupling between$$\hbox {FK}_q$$FKqpercolation and theq-state Potts model (which makes sense even for non-integerqbetween 1 and 4) if and only if$$q=4\cos ^2(4\pi / \kappa ')$$q=4cos2(4π/κ). This provides further evidence for the long-standing belief that$$\hbox {CLE}_{\kappa '}$$CLEκand$$\hbox {CLE}_{16/\kappa '}$$CLE16/κrepresent the scaling limits of$$\hbox {FK}_q$$FKqpercolation and theq-Potts model whenqand$$\kappa '$$κare related in this way. Another consequence of the formula for$$\rho (p,\kappa ')$$ρ(p,κ)is the value of half-plane arm exponents for such divide-and-color models (a.k.a. fuzzy Potts models) that turn out to take a somewhat different form than the usual critical exponents for two-dimensional models.

     
    more » « less
  2. Abstract

    Approximate integer programming is the following: For a given convex body$$K \subseteq {\mathbb {R}}^n$$KRn, either determine whether$$K \cap {\mathbb {Z}}^n$$KZnis empty, or find an integer point in the convex body$$2\cdot (K - c) +c$$2·(K-c)+cwhich isK, scaled by 2 from its center of gravityc. Approximate integer programming can be solved in time$$2^{O(n)}$$2O(n)while the fastest known methods for exact integer programming run in time$$2^{O(n)} \cdot n^n$$2O(n)·nn. So far, there are no efficient methods for integer programming known that are based on approximate integer programming. Our main contribution are two such methods, each yielding novel complexity results. First, we show that an integer point$$x^* \in (K \cap {\mathbb {Z}}^n)$$x(KZn)can be found in time$$2^{O(n)}$$2O(n), provided that theremaindersof each component$$x_i^* \mod \ell $$ximodfor some arbitrarily fixed$$\ell \ge 5(n+1)$$5(n+1)of$$x^*$$xare given. The algorithm is based on acutting-plane technique, iteratively halving the volume of the feasible set. The cutting planes are determined via approximate integer programming. Enumeration of the possible remainders gives a$$2^{O(n)}n^n$$2O(n)nnalgorithm for general integer programming. This matches the current best bound of an algorithm by Dadush (Integer programming, lattice algorithms, and deterministic, vol. Estimation. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, 2012) that is considerably more involved. Our algorithm also relies on a newasymmetric approximate Carathéodory theoremthat might be of interest on its own. Our second method concerns integer programming problems in equation-standard form$$Ax = b, 0 \le x \le u, \, x \in {\mathbb {Z}}^n$$Ax=b,0xu,xZn. Such a problem can be reduced to the solution of$$\prod _i O(\log u_i +1)$$iO(logui+1)approximate integer programming problems. This implies, for example thatknapsackorsubset-sumproblems withpolynomial variable range$$0 \le x_i \le p(n)$$0xip(n)can be solved in time$$(\log n)^{O(n)}$$(logn)O(n). For these problems, the best running time so far was$$n^n \cdot 2^{O(n)}$$nn·2O(n).

     
    more » « less
  3. Abstract

    In a Merlin–Arthur proof system, the proof verifier (Arthur) accepts valid proofs (from Merlin) with probability 1, and rejects invalid proofs with probability arbitrarily close to 1. The running time of such a system is defined to be the length of Merlin’s proof plus the running time of Arthur. We provide new Merlin–Arthur proof systems for some key problems in fine-grained complexity. In several cases our proof systems have optimal running time. Our main results include:

    Certifying that a list ofnintegers has no 3-SUM solution can be done in Merlin–Arthur time$$\tilde{O}(n)$$O~(n). Previously, Carmosino et al. [ITCS 2016] showed that the problem has a nondeterministic algorithm running in$$\tilde{O}(n^{1.5})$$O~(n1.5)time (that is, there is a proof system with proofs of length$$\tilde{O}(n^{1.5})$$O~(n1.5)and a deterministic verifier running in$$\tilde{O}(n^{1.5})$$O~(n1.5)time).

    Counting the number ofk-cliques with total edge weight equal to zero in ann-node graph can be done in Merlin–Arthur time$${\tilde{O}}(n^{\lceil k/2\rceil })$$O~(nk/2)(where$$k\ge 3$$k3). For oddk, this bound can be further improved for sparse graphs: for example, counting the number of zero-weight triangles in anm-edge graph can be done in Merlin–Arthur time$${\tilde{O}}(m)$$O~(m). Previous Merlin–Arthur protocols by Williams [CCC’16] and Björklund and Kaski [PODC’16] could only countk-cliques in unweighted graphs, and had worse running times for smallk.

    Computing the All-Pairs Shortest Distances matrix for ann-node graph can be done in Merlin–Arthur time$$\tilde{O}(n^2)$$O~(n2). Note this is optimal, as the matrix can have$$\Omega (n^2)$$Ω(n2)nonzero entries in general. Previously, Carmosino et al. [ITCS 2016] showed that this problem has an$$\tilde{O}(n^{2.94})$$O~(n2.94)nondeterministic time algorithm.

    Certifying that ann-variablek-CNF is unsatisfiable can be done in Merlin–Arthur time$$2^{n/2 - n/O(k)}$$2n/2-n/O(k). We also observe an algebrization barrier for the previous$$2^{n/2}\cdot \textrm{poly}(n)$$2n/2·poly(n)-time Merlin–Arthur protocol of R. Williams [CCC’16] for$$\#$$#SAT: in particular, his protocol algebrizes, and we observe there is no algebrizing protocol fork-UNSAT running in$$2^{n/2}/n^{\omega (1)}$$2n/2/nω(1)time. Therefore we have to exploit non-algebrizing properties to obtain our new protocol.

    Certifying a Quantified Boolean Formula is true can be done in Merlin–Arthur time$$2^{4n/5}\cdot \textrm{poly}(n)$$24n/5·poly(n). Previously, the only nontrivial result known along these lines was an Arthur–Merlin–Arthur protocol (where Merlin’s proof depends on some of Arthur’s coins) running in$$2^{2n/3}\cdot \textrm{poly}(n)$$22n/3·poly(n)time.

    Due to the centrality of these problems in fine-grained complexity, our results have consequences for many other problems of interest. For example, our work implies that certifying there is no Subset Sum solution tonintegers can be done in Merlin–Arthur time$$2^{n/3}\cdot \textrm{poly}(n)$$2n/3·poly(n), improving on the previous best protocol by Nederlof [IPL 2017] which took$$2^{0.49991n}\cdot \textrm{poly}(n)$$20.49991n·poly(n)time.

     
    more » « less
  4. Abstract

    Consider two half-spaces$$H_1^+$$H1+and$$H_2^+$$H2+in$${\mathbb {R}}^{d+1}$$Rd+1whose bounding hyperplanes$$H_1$$H1and$$H_2$$H2are orthogonal and pass through the origin. The intersection$${\mathbb {S}}_{2,+}^d:={\mathbb {S}}^d\cap H_1^+\cap H_2^+$$S2,+d:=SdH1+H2+is a spherical convex subset of thed-dimensional unit sphere$${\mathbb {S}}^d$$Sd, which contains a great subsphere of dimension$$d-2$$d-2and is called a spherical wedge. Choosenindependent random points uniformly at random on$${\mathbb {S}}_{2,+}^d$$S2,+dand consider the expected facet number of the spherical convex hull of these points. It is shown that, up to terms of lower order, this expectation grows like a constant multiple of$$\log n$$logn. A similar behaviour is obtained for the expected facet number of a homogeneous Poisson point process on$${\mathbb {S}}_{2,+}^d$$S2,+d. The result is compared to the corresponding behaviour of classical Euclidean random polytopes and of spherical random polytopes on a half-sphere.

     
    more » « less
  5. Abstract

    Sequence mappability is an important task in genome resequencing. In the (km)-mappability problem, for a given sequenceTof lengthn, the goal is to compute a table whoseith entry is the number of indices$$j \ne i$$jisuch that the length-msubstrings ofTstarting at positionsiandjhave at mostkmismatches. Previous works on this problem focused on heuristics computing a rough approximation of the result or on the case of$$k=1$$k=1. We present several efficient algorithms for the general case of the problem. Our main result is an algorithm that, for$$k=O(1)$$k=O(1), works in$$O(n)$$O(n)space and, with high probability, in$$O(n \cdot \min \{m^k,\log ^k n\})$$O(n·min{mk,logkn})time. Our algorithm requires a careful adaptation of thek-errata trees of Cole et al. [STOC 2004] to avoid multiple counting of pairs of substrings. Our technique can also be applied to solve the all-pairs Hamming distance problem introduced by Crochemore et al. [WABI 2017]. We further develop$$O(n^2)$$O(n2)-time algorithms to computeall(km)-mappability tables for a fixedmand all$$k\in \{0,\ldots ,m\}$$k{0,,m}or a fixedkand all$$m\in \{k,\ldots ,n\}$$m{k,,n}. Finally, we show that, for$$k,m = \Theta (\log n)$$k,m=Θ(logn), the (km)-mappability problem cannot be solved in strongly subquadratic time unless the Strong Exponential Time Hypothesis fails. This is an improved and extended version of a paper presented at SPIRE 2018.

     
    more » « less