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Title: A Move to Sustainability: Launching an Instructor Interface
Sketch Mechanix, an NSF-IUSE funded research project, launched a new feature with the Fall 2022 semester: an instructor interface. Sketch Mechanix’s development had previously focused upon converting to an html platform and then expanding problem types. The initial problem that was featured was truss analysis ( method of joints ). The second problem type was free body diagrams with point loads at any angle. The most recent sketch recognition feature was the addition of applied moments, using a curved arrow. For any of these problem types, Sketch Mechanix features sketch recognition and automatic feedback to students on their free body diagrams through an online homework platform. With this latest innovation, instructors adopting this novel homework system can now input their own problems, view student scores broken down by problem, and adjust assignment due dates. Prior to the launch of this interface, all of these features involved emailing the development team. For instance, the instructor previously had to email the desired problems, their solutions, and points awarded, as well as wait for the developer to email back student scores to be able to see how students were doing. While sketch recognition has long been the key draw to using Sketch Mechanix, the addition of the instructor interface will aid in the project’s sustainability as it nears the end of the grant period. This paper and poster describe the instructor interface, including screen shots, share feedback from instructors who tested the interface in classes, and detail the future of the program.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1726047
NSF-PAR ID:
10478852
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Publisher / Repository:
American Society for Engineering Education
Date Published:
Format(s):
Medium: X
Location:
Baltimore, MD
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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