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Title: “Getting into academia can be tough”: The mentoring needs of Black and Latinx engineering postdoctoral scholars.
This phenomenological study explores the mentoring needs of 13 Black and Latinx engineering postdoctoral scholars who aspire to the professoriate. An adaptation of the ideal mentoring model (Zambrana et al., 2015) is employed as the conceptual framework. Moustakas’ (1994) four-stage process of phenomenological data analysis was utilized to examine the interview data: epoché, horizontalization, imaginative variation, and synthesis. The phenomenon’s essence is: Black and Latinx engineering postdoctoral scholars have primary and secondary mentoring needs pertaining to their immediate career acquisition of a tenure-track faculty position. Primary mentoring needs include expanding their professional network and receiving support in being a competitive faculty applicant, as well as coaching on work-life balance. Secondary needs consist of enhancing and promoting their technical skills and acquiring political guidance on racial/ethnic bias in academia. The findings of this study reveal the importance of higher education institutions and postdoctoral advisors assuming greater responsibility for ensuring postdoctoral scholars receive the mentorship and career support they desire, which may require a systematic change in the postdoctoral training environment.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1821298
NSF-PAR ID:
10479946
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Auburn University
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of STEM Education: Innovations and Research
ISSN:
15575276
Subject(s) / Keyword(s):
["engineering postdoctoral scholars","mentoring","phenomenology"]
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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