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Title: Uncertainty Aware Proposal Segmentation for Unknown Object Detection
Recent efforts in deploying Deep Neural Networks for object detection in real world applications, such as autonomous driving, assume that all relevant object classes have been observed during training. Quantifying the performance of these models in settings when the test data is not represented in the training set has mostly focused on pixel-level uncertainty estimation techniques of models trained for semantic segmentation. This paper proposes to exploit additional predictions of semantic segmentation models and quantifying its confidences, followed by classification of object hypotheses as known vs. unknown, out of distribution objects. We use object proposals generated by Region Proposal Network (RPN) and adapt distance aware uncertainty estimation of semantic segmentation using Radial Basis Functions Networks (RBFN) for class agnostic object mask prediction. The augmented object proposals are then used to train a classifier for known vs. unknown objects categories. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method achieves parallel performance to state of the art methods for unknown object detection and can also be used effectively for reducing object detectors' false positive rate. Our method is well suited for applications where prediction of non-object background categories obtained by semantic segmentation is reliable.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1925231
NSF-PAR ID:
10480460
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Publisher / Repository:
IEEE
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the IEEE/CVF Winter Conference on Applications of Computer Vision
Format(s):
Medium: X
Location:
Waikola, Hawaii
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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