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Title: Breaking Radial Dipole Symmetry in Planar Macrocycles Modulates Edge‐to‐Edge Packing and Disrupts Cofacial Stacking
Abstract

Dipolar interactions are ever‐present in supramolecular architectures, though their impact is typically revealed by making dipoles stronger. While it is also possible to assess the role of dipoles by altering their orientations by using synthetic design, doing so without altering the molecular shape is not straightforward. We have now done this by flipping one triazole unit in a rigid macrocycle, tricarb. The macrocycle is composed of three carbazoles (2 Debye) and three triazoles (5 Debye) defining an array of dipoles aligned radially but organized alternately in and out. These dipoles are believed to dictate edge‐to‐edge tiling and face‐to‐face stacking. We modified our synthesis to prepare isosteric macrocycles with the orientation of one triazole dipole rotated 40°. The new dipole orientation guides edge‐to‐edge contacts to reorder the stability of two surface‐bound 2D polymorphs. The impact on dipole‐enhanced π stacking, however, was unexpected. Our stacking model identified an unchanged set of short‐range (3.4 Å)anti‐parallel dipole contacts. Despite this situation, the reduction in self‐association was attributed to long‐range (~6.4 Å) dipolar repulsions between π‐stacked macrocycles. This work highlights our ability to control the build‐up and symmetry of macrocyclic skeletons by synthetic design, and the work needed to further our understanding of how dipoles control self‐assembly.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10480777
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Chemistry – A European Journal
Volume:
30
Issue:
8
ISSN:
0947-6539
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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