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Title: Board 313: Implementing Computational Thinking Strategies across the Middle/High Science Curriculum
This NSF Research Experience for Teachers (RET)“Research Experience for Teachers in Big Data and Data Science”(award number: 1801513) engaged four middle/high school science teachers in summer 2022 with research related to big data and data science, with follow-up school year implementation of related curriculum. These teachers developed curriculum related to their summer research experience in big data and data science that spanned a range of student ages and topics: middle school science, 9th grade biology, 9th grade health, and 11th grade chemistry. Despite the wide range of student ages, curricular content, and instructional goals, all teachers found rich and varied curriculum applications that fit within their existing curriculum constraints.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1801513
NSF-PAR ID:
10489398
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Publisher / Repository:
ASEE
Date Published:
Journal Name:
2023 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition
Format(s):
Medium: X
Location:
Baltimore, MD
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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