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Title: Responses of stomatal density and carbon isotope composition of sugar maple and yellow birch foliage to N, P and CaSiO3 fertilization
Abstract

Stomatal density, stomatal length and carbon isotope composition can all provide insights into environmental controls on photosynthesis and transpiration. Stomatal measurements can be time-consuming; it is therefore wise to consider efficient sampling schemes. Knowing the variance partitioning at different measurement levels (i.e., among stands, plots, trees, leaves and within leaves) can aid in making informed decisions around where to focus sampling effort. In this study, we explored the effects of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and calcium silicate (CaSiO3) addition on stomatal density, length and carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) and yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis Britton). We observed a positive but small (8%) increase in stomatal density with P addition and an increase in δ13C with N and CaSiO3 addition in sugar maple, but we did not observe effects of nutrient addition on these characteristics in yellow birch. Variability was highest within leaves and among trees for stomatal density and highest among stomata for stomatal length. To reduce variability and increase chances of detecting treatment differences in stomatal density and length, future protocols should consider pretreatment and repeated measurements of trees over time or measure more trees per plot, increase the number of leaf impressions or standardize their locations, measure more stomata per image and ensure consistent light availability.

 
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Award ID(s):
1637685 2224545
NSF-PAR ID:
10489794
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Editor(s):
Inselsbacher, Erich
Publisher / Repository:
Oxford University Press
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Tree Physiology
ISSN:
1758-4469
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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