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Title: Enantioselective and Regiodivergent Synthesis of Propargyl‐ and Allenylsilanes through Catalytic Propargylic C−H Deprotonation
Abstract

We report a highly enantioselective intermolecular C−H bond silylation catalyzed by a phosphoramidite‐ligated iridium catalyst. Under reagent‐controlled protocols, propargylsilanes resulting from C(sp3)−H functionalization, as well the regioisomeric and synthetically versatile allenylsilanes, could be obtained with excellent levels of enantioselectivity and good to excellent control of propargyl/allenyl selectivity. In the case of unsymmetrical dialkyl acetylenes, good to excellent selectivity for functionalization at the less‐hindered site was also observed. A variety of electrophilic silyl sources (R3SiOTf and R3SiNTf2), either commercial or in situgenerated, were used as the silylation reagents, and a broad range of simple and functionalized alkynes, including aryl alkyl acetylenes, dialkyl acetylenes, 1,3‐enynes, and drug derivatives were successfully employed as substrates. Detailed mechanistic experiments and DFT calculations suggest that an η3‐propargyl/allenyl Ir intermediate is generated upon π‐complexation‐assisted deprotonation and undergoes outer‐sphere attack by the electrophilic silylating reagent to give propargylic silanes, with the latter step identified as the enantiodetermining step.

 
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Award ID(s):
2247505
NSF-PAR ID:
10495601
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Volume:
63
Issue:
16
ISSN:
1433-7851
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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