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Title: Brown Dwarf Candidates in the JADES and CEERS Extragalactic Surveys
Abstract

By combining the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)/NIRCam JADES and CEERS extragalactic data sets, we have uncovered a sample of 21 T and Y brown dwarf candidates at best-fit distances between 0.1 and 4.2 kpc. These sources were selected by targeting the blue 1–2.5μm colors and red 3–4.5μm colors that arise from molecular absorption in the atmospheres ofTeff< 1300 K brown dwarfs. We fit these sources using multiple models of substellar atmospheres and present the resulting fluxes, sizes, effective temperatures, and other derived properties for the sample. If confirmed, these fits place the majority of the sources in the Milky Way thick disk and halo. We observe proper motions for seven of the candidate brown dwarfs, with directions in agreement with the plane of our Galaxy, providing evidence that they are not extragalactic in nature. We demonstrate how the colors of these sources differ from selected high-redshift galaxies, and explore the selection of these sources in planned large-area JWST NIRCam surveys. Deep imaging with JWST/NIRCam presents an an excellent opportunity for finding and understanding these ultracool dwarfs at kiloparsec distances.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10495604
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
DOI PREFIX: 10.3847
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:
964
Issue:
1
ISSN:
0004-637X
Format(s):
Medium: X Size: Article No. 66
Size(s):
["Article No. 66"]
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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