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Title: EDGE-LLM: Enabling Efficient Large Language Model Adaptation on Edge Devices via Unified Compression and Adaptive Layer Voting
Award ID(s):
2345577
NSF-PAR ID:
10498147
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
ACM
Date Published:
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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