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Title: DeepDOF-SE: affordable deep-learning microscopy platform for slide-free histology
Abstract

Histopathology plays a critical role in the diagnosis and surgical management of cancer. However, access to histopathology services, especially frozen section pathology during surgery, is limited in resource-constrained settings because preparing slides from resected tissue is time-consuming, labor-intensive, and requires expensive infrastructure. Here, we report a deep-learning-enabled microscope, named DeepDOF-SE, to rapidly scan intact tissue at cellular resolution without the need for physical sectioning. Three key features jointly make DeepDOF-SE practical. First, tissue specimens are stained directly with inexpensive vital fluorescent dyes and optically sectioned with ultra-violet excitation that localizes fluorescent emission to a thin surface layer. Second, a deep-learning algorithm extends the depth-of-field, allowing rapid acquisition of in-focus images from large areas of tissue even when the tissue surface is highly irregular. Finally, a semi-supervised generative adversarial network virtually stains DeepDOF-SE fluorescence images with hematoxylin-and-eosin appearance, facilitating image interpretation by pathologists without significant additional training. We developed the DeepDOF-SE platform using a data-driven approach and validated its performance by imaging surgical resections of suspected oral tumors. Our results show that DeepDOF-SE provides histological information of diagnostic importance, offering a rapid and affordable slide-free histology platform for intraoperative tumor margin assessment and in low-resource settings.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10499131
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Nature Publishing Group
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Volume:
15
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2041-1723
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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