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Title: Data report: X-ray fluorescence scanning of sediment cores, IODP Expedition 390/393 Site U1583, South Atlantic Transect
The western South Atlantic Ocean has not been drilled since the end of the Deep Sea Drilling Program, leading to a dearth of sedimentary sequences available from this sector of the Atlantic Ocean. In 2020–2022, a transect of new sites was drilled during International Ocean Discovery Program Expeditions 390C, 395E, 390, and 393 at 31°S and spanning from 28.8°W to 15.2°W. Here, we use X-ray fluorescence data, combined with shipboard magnetic susceptibility and natural gamma radiation, to characterize the sediments below the oligotrophic South Atlantic Gyre at Site U1583. These geochemical data add to the otherwise understudied southwest Atlantic Ocean.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1326927
NSF-PAR ID:
10499233
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; more » ; ; ; ; « less
Publisher / Repository:
International Ocean Discovery Program
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition reports
Volume:
390/393
Issue:
202
ISSN:
2377-3189
Subject(s) / Keyword(s):
["International Ocean Discovery Program","JOIDES Resolution","Expedition 393","South Atlantic Transect","Site U1583","Oligocene","Miocene","Pliocene","Pleistocene","Neogene"]
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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