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Title: Radio imaging of gravitationally lensed radio-quiet quasars
ABSTRACT

We present 6 GHz Very Large Array radio images of 70 gravitational lens systems at 300 mas resolution, in which the source is an optically selected quasar, and nearly all of which have two lensed images. We find that about in half of the systems (40/70, with 33/70 secure), one or more lensed images are detected down to our detection limit of 20 μJy beam−1, similar to previous investigations and reinforcing the conclusion that typical optically selected quasars have intrinsic GHz radio flux densities of a few μJy (∼1023 W Hz−1 at redshifts of 1–2). In addition, for 10 cases it is likely that the lensing galaxies are detected in the radio. Available detections of, and limits on the far-infrared luminosities from the literature, suggest that nearly all of the sample lie on the radio-FIR correlation typical of star-forming galaxies, and that their radio luminosities are at least compatible with the radio emission being produced by star formation processes. One object, WISE2329−1258, has an extra radio component that is not present in optical images, and is difficult to explain using simple lens models. In-band spectral indices, where these can be determined, are generally moderately steep and consistent with synchrotron processes either from star formation/supernovae or AGNs. Comparison of the A/B image flux ratios at radio and optical wavelengths suggests a 10 per cent level contribution from finite source effects or optical extinction to the optical flux ratios, together with sporadic larger discrepancies that are likely to be due to optical microlensing.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10499390
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Oxford University Press
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume:
530
Issue:
1
ISSN:
0035-8711
Format(s):
Medium: X Size: p. 221-234
Size(s):
["p. 221-234"]
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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