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This content will become publicly available on March 25, 2025

Title: Chasing Fairness in Graphs: A GNN Architecture Perspective

There has been significant progress in improving the performance of graph neural networks (GNNs) through enhancements in graph data, model architecture design, and training strategies. For fairness in graphs, recent studies achieve fair representations and predictions through either graph data pre-processing (e.g., node feature masking, and topology rewiring) or fair training strategies (e.g., regularization, adversarial debiasing, and fair contrastive learning). How to achieve fairness in graphs from the model architecture perspective is less explored. More importantly, GNNs exhibit worse fairness performance compared to multilayer perception since their model architecture (i.e., neighbor aggregation) amplifies biases. To this end, we aim to achieve fairness via a new GNN architecture. We propose Fair Message Passing (FMP) designed within a unified optimization framework for GNNs. Notably, FMP explicitly renders sensitive attribute usage in forward propagation for node classification task using cross-entropy loss without data pre-processing. In FMP, the aggregation is first adopted to utilize neighbors' information and then the bias mitigation step explicitly pushes demographic group node presentation centers together.In this way, FMP scheme can aggregate useful information from neighbors and mitigate bias to achieve better fairness and prediction tradeoff performance. Experiments on node classification tasks demonstrate that the proposed FMP outperforms several baselines in terms of fairness and accuracy on three real-world datasets. The code is available at https://github.com/zhimengj0326/FMP.

 
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Award ID(s):
1939716 2239257
NSF-PAR ID:
10500909
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
AAAI
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence
Volume:
38
Issue:
19
ISSN:
2159-5399
Page Range / eLocation ID:
21214 to 21222
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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