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Title: NE2001p: A Native Python Implementation of the NE2001 Galactic Electron Density Model
Abstract

The Galactic electron density model NE2001 describes the multicomponent ionized structure of the Milky Way interstellar medium. NE2001 forward models the dispersion and scattering of compact radio sources, including pulsars, fast radio bursts, active galactic nuclei, and masers, and the model is routinely used to predict the distances of radio sources lacking independent distance measures. Here we present the open-source package NE2001p, a fully Python implementation of NE2001. The model parameters are identical to NE2001 but the computational architecture is optimized for Python, yielding small (<1%) numerical differences between NE2001p and the Fortran code. NE2001p can be used on the command-line and through Python scripts available on PyPI. Future package releases will include modular extensions aimed at providing short-term improvements to model accuracy, including a modified thick disk scale height and additional clumps and voids. This implementation of NE2001 is a springboard to a next-generation Galactic electron density model now in development.

 
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Award ID(s):
2020265
NSF-PAR ID:
10501152
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Publisher / Repository:
Research Notes of the AAS
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Research Notes of the AAS
Volume:
8
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2515-5172
Page Range / eLocation ID:
17
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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