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Title: Algorithmic reconstruction of the fiber of persistent homology on cell complexes
Abstract

Let Kbe a finite simplicial, cubical, delta or CW complex. The persistence map $$\textrm{PH}$$PHtakes a filter $$f:K\rightarrow \mathbb {R}$$f:KRas input and returns the barcodes of the sublevel set persistent homology of fin each dimension. We address the inverse problem: given target barcodes D, computing the fiber $$\textrm{PH}^{-1}(D)$$PH-1(D). For this, we use the fact that $$\textrm{PH}^{-1}(D)$$PH-1(D)decomposes as a polyhedral complex when Kis a simplicial complex, and we generalise this result to arbitrary based chain complexes. We then design and implement a depth-first search that recovers the polytopes forming the fiber $$\textrm{PH}^{-1}(D)$$PH-1(D). As an application, we solve a corpus of 120 sample problems, providing a first insight into the statistical structure of these fibers, for general CW complexes.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10501316
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Publisher / Repository:
Springer Science + Business Media
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Applied and Computational Topology
ISSN:
2367-1726
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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