skip to main content

Attention:

The NSF Public Access Repository (NSF-PAR) system and access will be unavailable from 11:00 PM ET on Thursday, June 13 until 2:00 AM ET on Friday, June 14 due to maintenance. We apologize for the inconvenience.


This content will become publicly available on January 1, 2025

Title: Empowering Dementia Caregivers: Incorporating Caregiving Training Resources Into Current Procedural Technology Codes
Abstract Purpose/Objectives

We aim to explore Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes for caregiving training services and their potential impacts on caregivers of people living with dementia.

Description of the Project/Program

In response to the growing need for support for caregivers of people living with physical and mental health issues, CPT codes for caregiving training services will be activated for the calendar year 2024. These codes cover (1) family group behavior management and modification training services and (2) caregiver training for techniques to help patients maintain their quality of life. Caregivers will access such training support through the CPT codes provided by treating practitioners. The duration of training will vary by code.

Outcome

Implementing CPT codes for caregiver training services highlights the vital role of caregivers in patient care. This support may improve their skills and communication with healthcare providers. However, timing and accessibility in care delivery need clarification, especially for caregivers of people living with dementia. Regular skill assessment and culturally competent care are essential. Before providing the service, provider training may also promote person-centered care, benefiting patients and their caregivers.

Conclusion

Activating CPT codes for caregiving training services may enhance caregivers' support and skills, including dementia care.

 
more » « less
Award ID(s):
1838589
NSF-PAR ID:
10502112
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Wolters Kluwer
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Clinical Nurse Specialist
Volume:
38
Issue:
2
ISSN:
0887-6274
Page Range / eLocation ID:
107 to 109
Subject(s) / Keyword(s):
["dementia","caregiving","nursing"]
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
More Like this
  1. Abstract Aim

    The aim of this study is to develop a Smarthealth system of monitoring, modelling, and interactive recommendation solutions (for caregivers) for in‐home dementia patient care that focuses on caregiver–patient relationships.

    Design

    This descriptive study employs a single‐group, non‐randomized trial to examine functionality, effectiveness, feasibility, and acceptability of the novel Smarthealth system.

    Methods

    Thirty persons with Alzheimer's Disease or related dementia and their family caregivers (N = 30 dyads) will receive and install Smarthealth technology in their home. There will be a 1‐month observation phase for collecting baseline mood states and a 2‐month implementation phase when caregivers will receive stress management techniques for each detected, negative mood state. Caregivers will report technique implementation and usefulness, sent via Ecological Momentary Assessment system to the study‐provided smartphone. Caregivers will provide daily, self‐reported mood and health ratings. Instruments measuring caregiver assessment of disruptive behaviours and their effect on caregivers; caregiver depressive symptoms, anxiety and stress; caregiver strain; and family functioning will be completed at baseline and 3 months. The study received funding in 2018 and ethics board approval in 2019.

    Discussion

    This study will develop and test novel in‐home technology to improve family caregiving relationships. Results from this study will help develop and improve the Smarthealth recommendation system and determine its usefulness, feasibility, and acceptability for persons with dementia and their family caregiver.

    Impact

    The Smarthealth technology discussed will provide in‐home stress reduction resources at a time when older adults may be experiencing increasingly high rates of isolation and anxiety and caregiver dyads may be experiencing high levels of relationship strain.

    Trial Registration

    This study was registered with Clinical Trials.gov (Identifier NCT04536701).

     
    more » « less
  2. Persons with dementia (PwD) are heavily dependent on the support of informal, dementia caregivers to fulfill their day-to-day care needs. Dementia caregivers, often friends and family members of the PwD, are unpaid, non-professional individuals who take on many of the care responsibilities. Due to the lack of formal training, social support, and information resources, among other factors, dementia caregivers are often at risk for negative outcomes such as stress and burden. There have not been any comprehensive assessment tools to predict these negative outcomes. Therefore, we employ the NASA TLX dimensions to conceptualize caregiver workload. This study operationalizes the NASA TLX dimensions in the context of dementia caregiving and illustrates examples for each of the dimensions. The results indicate that the NASA TLX does not include all of the factors necessary to conceptualize caregiver workload and prescribe a need for developing a robust caregiver workload assessment tool. 
    more » « less
  3. Robots have great potential to support people with dementia (PwD) and their caregivers. They can provide support for daily living tasks, conduct household chores, provide companionship, and deliver cognitive stimulation and training. Personalizing these robots to an individual’s abilities and preferences can help enhance the quality of support they provide, increase their usability and acceptability, and alleviate caregiver burden. However, personalization can also introduce many risks, including risks to the safety and autonomy of PwD, the potential to exacerbate social isolation, and risks of being taken advantage of due to dark patterns in robot design. In this article, we weigh the risks and benefits by drawing on empirical data garnered from the existing ecosystem of robots used for dementia caregiving. We also explore ethical considerations for developing personalized cognitively assistive robots for PwD, including how a robot can practice beneficence to PwD, where responsibility falls when harm to a PwD occurs because of a robot, and how a robot can acquire informed consent from a PwD. We propose key technical and policy concepts to help robot designers, lawmakers, and others to develop personalized robots that protect users from unintended consequences, particularly for people with cognitive impairments. 
    more » « less
  4. Robots have great potential to support people with dementia (PwD) and their caregivers. They can provide support for daily living tasks, conduct household chores, provide companionship, and deliver cognitive stimulation and training. Personalizing these robots to an individual’s abilities and preferences can help enhance the quality of support they provide, increase their usability and acceptability, and alleviate caregiver burden. However, personalization can also introduce many risks, including risks to the safety and autonomy of PwD, the potential to exacerbate social isolation, and risks of being taken advantage of due to dark patterns in robot design. In this article, we weigh the risks and benefits by drawing on empirical data garnered from the existing ecosystem of robots used for dementia caregiving. We also explore ethical considerations for developing personalized cognitively assistive robots for PwD, including how a robot can practice beneficence to PwD, where responsibility falls when harm to a PwD occurs because of a robot, and how a robot can acquire informed consent from a PwD. We propose key technical and policy concepts to help robot designers, lawmakers, and others to develop personalized robots that protect users from unintended consequences, particularly for people with cognitive impairments. 
    more » « less
  5. Background

    Monitoring technologies are used to collect a range of information, such as one’s location out of the home or movement within the home, and transmit that information to caregivers to support aging in place. Their surveilling nature, however, poses ethical dilemmas and can be experienced as intrusive to people living with Alzheimer disease (AD) and AD-related dementias. These challenges are compounded when older adults are not engaged in decision-making about how they are monitored. Dissemination of these technologies is outpacing our understanding of how to communicate their functions, risks, and benefits to families and older adults. To date, there are no tools to help families understand the functions of monitoring technologies or guide them in balancing their perceived need for ongoing surveillance and the older adult’s dignity and wishes.

    Objective

    We designed, developed, and piloted a communication and education tool in the form of a web application called Let’s Talk Tech to support family decision-making about diverse technologies used in dementia home care. The knowledge base about how to design online interventions for people living with mild dementia is still in development, and dyadic interventions used in dementia care remain rare. We describe the intervention’s motivation and development process, and the feasibility of using this self-administered web application intervention in a pilot sample of people living with mild AD and their family care partners.

    Methods

    We surveyed 29 mild AD dementia care dyads living together before and after they completed the web application intervention and interviewed each dyad about their experiences with it. We report postintervention measures of feasibility (recruitment, enrollment, and retention) and acceptability (satisfaction, quality, and usability). Descriptive statistics were calculated for survey items, and thematic analysis was used with interview transcripts to illuminate participants’ experiences and recommendations to improve the intervention.

    Results

    The study enrolled 33 people living with AD and their care partners, and 29 (88%) dyads completed the study (all but one were spousal dyads). Participants were asked to complete 4 technology modules, and all completed them. The majority of participants rated the tool as having the right length (>90%), having the right amount of information (>84%), being very clearly worded (>74%), and presenting information in a balanced way (>90%). Most felt the tool was easy to use and helpful, and would likely recommend it to others.

    Conclusions

    This study demonstrated that our intervention to educate and facilitate conversation and documentation of preferences is preliminarily feasible and acceptable to mild AD care dyads. Effectively involving older adults in these decisions and informing care partners of their preferences could enable families to avoid conflicts or risks associated with uninformed or disempowered use and to personalize use so both members of the dyad can experience benefits.

     
    more » « less