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Title: Anti-Hebbian plasticity drives sequence learning in striatum
Abstract

Spatio-temporal activity patterns have been observed in a variety of brain areas in spontaneous activity, prior to or during action, or in response to stimuli. Biological mechanisms endowing neurons with the ability to distinguish between different sequences remain largely unknown. Learning sequences of spikes raises multiple challenges, such as maintaining in memory spike history and discriminating partially overlapping sequences. Here, we show that anti-Hebbian spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP), as observed at cortico-striatal synapses, can naturally lead to learning spike sequences. We design a spiking model of the striatal output neuron receiving spike patterns defined as sequential input from a fixed set of cortical neurons. We use a simple synaptic plasticity rule that combines anti-Hebbian STDP and non-associative potentiation for a subset of the presented patterns called rewarded patterns. We study the ability of striatal output neurons to discriminate rewarded from non-rewarded patterns by firing only after the presentation of a rewarded pattern. In particular, we show that two biological properties of striatal networks, spiking latency and collateral inhibition, contribute to an increase in accuracy, by allowing a better discrimination of partially overlapping sequences. These results suggest that anti-Hebbian STDP may serve as a biological substrate for learning sequences of spikes.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10506095
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Nature Publishing Group
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Communications Biology
Volume:
7
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2399-3642
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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