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Title: Tailoring Synthetic Polypeptide Design for Directed Fibril Superstructure Formation and Enhanced Hydrogel Properties
The biological significance of self-assembled protein filament networks and their unique mechanical properties have sparked interest in the development of synthetic filament networks that mimic these attributes. Building on the recent advancement of autoaccelerated ring-opening polymerization of amino acid N-carboxyanhydrides (NCAs), this study strategically explores a series of random copolymers comprising multiple amino acids, aiming to elucidate the core principles governing gelation pathways of these purpose-designed copolypeptides. Utilizing glutamate (Glu) as the primary component of copolypeptides, two targeted pathways were pursued: first, achieving a fast fibrillation rate with lower interaction potential using serine (Ser) as a comonomer, facilitating the creation of homogeneous fibril networks; and second, creating more rigid networks of fibril clusters by incorporating alanine (Ala) and valine (Val) as comonomers. The selection of amino acids played a pivotal role in steering both the morphology of fibril superstructures and their assembly kinetics, subsequently determining their potential to form sample-spanning networks. Importantly, the viscoelastic properties of the resulting supramolecular hydrogels can be tailored according to the specific copolypeptide composition through modulations in filament densities and lengths. The findings enhance our understanding of directed self-assembly in high molecular weight synthetic copolypeptides, offering valuable insights for the development of synthetic fibrous networks and biomimetic supramolecular materials with custom-designed properties.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2210590
NSF-PAR ID:
10507336
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
ACS Publications
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Volume:
146
Issue:
9
ISSN:
0002-7863
Page Range / eLocation ID:
5823 to 5833
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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