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Title: Polymers on plasmonic metal nanoparticles: From symmetric coating to asymmetric surface patterning
We summarize recent advances in the design of hybrid nanostructures through the combination of synthetic polymers and plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs). We categorize the synthetic methods of those polymer-coated metal NPs into two main strategies: direct encapsulation and chemical grafting, based on how NPs interact with polymers. In direct encapsulation, NPs with hydrophobic ligands are physically encapsulated into polymer micelles, primarily through hydrophobic interactions. We discuss strategies for controlling the loading numbers and locations of NPs within polymer micelles. On the other hand, polymer-grafted NPs (PGNPs) have synthetic polymers as ligands chemically grafted on NPs. We highlight that polymer ligands can asymmetrically coat metal NPs through hydrophobicity-driven phase segregation using homopolymers, BCPs and blocky random copolymers. This review provides insights into the methodologies and mechanisms to design new nanostructures of polymers and NPs, aiming to enhance the understanding of this rapidly evolving field.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2102245
NSF-PAR ID:
10510521
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Elsevier
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Polymer
Volume:
303
Issue:
C
ISSN:
0032-3861
Page Range / eLocation ID:
127115
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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