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This content will become publicly available on October 6, 2024

Title: Causal Necessity as a Narrative Planning Step Cost Function
Narrative planning generates a sequence of actions which must achieve the author's goal for the story and must be composed only of actions that make sense for the characters who take them. A causally necessary action is one that would make the plan impossible to execute if it were left out. We hypothesize that action sequences which are solutions to narrative planning problems are more likely to feature causally necessary actions than those which are not solutions. In this paper, we show that prioritizing sequences with more causally necessary actions can lead to solutions faster in ten benchmark story planning problems.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2145153
NSF-PAR ID:
10515115
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Publisher / Repository:
AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment
Volume:
19
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2326-909X
Page Range / eLocation ID:
155 to 164
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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