skip to main content

Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Alexeev, Yuri"

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available November 1, 2022
  2. Trapped-ion qubits are a leading technology for practical quantum computing. In this work, we present an architectural analysis of a linear-tape architecture for trapped ions. In order to realize our study, we develop and evaluate mapping and scheduling algorithms for this architecture. In particular, we introduce TILT, a linear “Turing-machinelike” architecture with a multilaser control “head,” where a linear chain of ions moves back and forth under the laser head. We find that TILT can substantially reduce communication as compared with comparable-sized Quantum Charge Coupled Device (QCCD) architectures. We also develop two important scheduling heuristics for TILT. The first heuristicmore »reduces the number of swap operations by matching data traveling in opposite directions into an “opposing swap.”, and also avoids the maximum swap distance across the width of the head, as maximum swap distances make scheduling multiple swaps in one head position difficult. The second heuristic minimizes ion chain motion by scheduling the tape to the position with the maximal executable operations for every movement. We provide application performance results from our simulation, which suggest that TILT can outperform QCCD in a range of NISQ applications in terms of success rate (up to 4.35x and 1.95x on average). We also discuss using TILT as a building block to extend existing scalable trapped-ion quantum computing proposals.« less
  3. Quantum circuit simulations are critical for evaluating quantum algorithms and machines. However, the number of state amplitudes required for full simulation increases exponentially with the number of qubits. In this study, we leverage data compression to reduce memory requirements, trading computation time and fidelity for memory space. Specifically, we develop a hybrid solution by combining the lossless compression and our tailored lossy compression method with adaptive error bounds at each timestep of the simulation. Our approach optimizes for compression speed and makes sure that errors due to lossy compression are uncorrelated, an important property for comparing simulation output with physicalmore »machines. Experiments show that our approach reduces the memory requirement of simulating the 61-qubit Grover's search algorithm from 32 exabytes to 768 terabytes of memory on Argonne's Theta supercomputer using 4,096 nodes. The results suggest that our techniques can increase the simulation size by 2~16 qubits for general quantum circuits.« less
  4. In order to evaluate, validate, and refine the design of a new quantum algorithm or a quantum computer, researchers and developers need methods to assess their correctness and fidelity. This requires the capabilities of simulation for full quantum state amplitudes. However, the number of quantum state amplitudes increases exponentially with the number of qubits, leading to the exponential growth of the memory requirement. In this work, we present our technique to simulate more qubits than previously reported by using lossy data compression. Our empirical data suggests that we can simulate full state quantum circuits up to 63 qubits with 0.8more »petabytes memory.« less
  5. Classical simulation of quantum circuits is crucial for evaluating and validating the design of new quantum algorithms. However, the number of quantum state amplitudes increases exponentially with the number of qubits, leading to the exponential growth of the memory requirement for the simulations. In this paper, we present a new data reduction technique to reduce the memory requirement of quantum circuit simulations. We apply our amplitude-aware lossy compression technique to the quantum state amplitude vector to trade the computation time and fidelity for memory space. The experimental results show that our simulator only needs 1/16 of the original memory requirementmore »to simulate Quantum Fourier Transform circuits with 99.95% fidelity. The reduction amount of memory requirement suggests that we could increase 4 qubits in the quantum circuit simulation comparing to the simulation without our technique. Additionally, for some specific circuits, like Grover’s search, we could increase the simulation size by 18 qubits.« less
  6. In order to evaluate, validate, and refine the design of new quantum algorithms or quantum computers, researchers and developers need methods to assess their correctness and fidelity. This requires the capabilities of quantum circuit simulations. However, the number of quantum state amplitudes increases exponentially with the number of qubits, leading to the exponential growth of the memory requirement for the simulations. In this work, we present our memory-efficient quantum circuit simulation by using lossy data compression. Our empirical data shows that we reduce the memory requirement to 16.5% and 2.24E-06 of the original requirement for QFT and Grover’s search, respectively.more »This finding further suggests that we can simulate deep quantum circuits up to 63 qubits with 0.8 petabytes memory.« less
  7. We describe how classical supercomputing can aid unreliable quantum processors of intermediate size to solve large problem instances reliably. We advocate using a hybrid quantum-classical architecture where larger quantum circuits are broken into smaller sub-circuits that are evaluated separately, either using a quantum processor or a quantum simulator running on a classical supercomputer. Circuit compilation techniques that determine which qubits are simulated classically will greatly impact the system performance as well as provide a tradeoff between circuit reliability and runtime. We describe how classical supercomputing can aid unreliable quantum processors of intermediate size to solve large problem instances reliably. Wemore »advocate using a hybrid quantum-classical architecture where larger quantum circuits are broken into smaller sub-circuits that are evaluated separately, either using a quantum processor or a quantum simulator running on a classical supercomputer. Circuit compilation techniques that determine which qubits are simulated classically will greatly impact the system performance as well as provide a tradeoff between circuit reliability and runtime.« less