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  1. null (Ed.)
    We propose a new setting for testing properties of distributions while receiving samples from several distributions, but few samples per distribution. Given samples from s distributions, p_1, p_2, …, p_s, we design testers for the following problems: (1) Uniformity Testing: Testing whether all the p_i’s are uniform or ε-far from being uniform in ℓ_1-distance (2) Identity Testing: Testing whether all the p_i’s are equal to an explicitly given distribution q or ε-far from q in ℓ_1-distance, and (3) Closeness Testing: Testing whether all the p_i’s are equal to a distribution q which we have sample access to, or ε-far from q in ℓ_1-distance. By assuming an additional natural condition about the source distributions, we provide sample optimal testers for all of these problems. 
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  2. We propose a new setting for testing properties of distributions while receiving samples from several distributions, but few samples per distribution. Given samples from s distributions, p_1, p_2, …, p_s, we design testers for the following problems: (1) Uniformity Testing: Testing whether all the p_i’s are uniform or ε-far from being uniform in ℓ_1-distance (2) Identity Testing: Testing whether all the p_i’s are equal to an explicitly given distribution q or ε-far from q in ℓ_1-distance, and (3) Closeness Testing: Testing whether all the p_i’s are equal to a distribution q which we have sample access to, or ε-far from q in ℓ_1-distance. By assuming an additional natural condition about the source distributions, we provide sample optimal testers for all of these problems. 
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  3. null (Ed.)
    Determinantal point processes (DPPs) are popular probabilistic models of diversity. In this paper, we investigate DPPs from a new perspective: property testing of distributions. Given sample access to an unknown distribution q over the subsets of a ground set, we aim to distinguish whether q is a DPP distribution or ϵ-far from all DPP distributions in ℓ1-distance. In this work, we propose the first algorithm for testing DPPs. Furthermore, we establish a matching lower bound on the sample complexity of DPP testing. This lower bound also extends to showing a new hardness result for the problem of testing the more general class of log-submodular distributions 
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  4. There has been significant study on the sample complexity of testing properties of distributions over large domains. For many properties, it is known that the sample complexity can be substantially smaller than the domain size. For example, over a domain of size n, distinguishing the uniform distribution from distributions that are far from uniform in ℓ1-distance uses only O(n−−√) samples. However, the picture is very different in the presence of arbitrary noise, even when the amount of noise is quite small. In this case, one must distinguish if samples are coming from a distribution that is ϵ-close to uniform from the case where the distribution is (1−ϵ)-far from uniform. The latter task requires nearly linear in n samples (Valiant, 2008; Valiant and Valiant, 2017a). In this work, we present a noise model that on one hand is more tractable for the testing problem, and on the other hand represents a rich class of noise families. In our model, the noisy distribution is a mixture of the original distribution and noise, where the latter is known to the tester either explicitly or via sample access; the form of the noise is also known \emph{a priori}. Focusing on the identity and closeness testing problems leads to the following mixture testing question: Given samples of distributions p,q1,q2, can we test if p is a mixture of q1 and q2? We consider this general question in various scenarios that differ in terms of how the tester can access the distributions, and show that indeed this problem is more tractable. Our results show that the sample complexity of our testers are exactly the same as for the classical non-mixture case. 
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  5. null (Ed.)
    Statistical tests are at the heart of many scientific tasks. To validate their hypothesis, researchers in medical and social sciences use individuals' data. The sensitivity of participants' data requires the design of statistical tests that ensure the privacy of the individuals in the most efficient way. In this paper, we use the framework of property testing to design algorithms to test the properties of the distribution that the data is drawn from with respect to differential privacy. In particular, we investigate testing two fundamental properties of distributions: (1) testing the equivalence of two distributions when we have unequal numbers of samples from the two distributions. (2) Testing independence of two random variables. In both cases, we show that our testers achieve near optimal sample complexity (up to logarithmic factors). Moreover, our dependence on the privacy parameter is an additive term, which indicates that differential privacy can be obtained in most regimes of parameters for free. 
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