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Creators/Authors contains: "Arnold, David P."

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  1. We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a prototype that meets the form, fit, and function of a household 1.5 V AA battery, but which can be wirelessly recharged without removal from the host device. The prototype system comprises a low-frequency electrodynamic wireless power transmission (EWPT) receiver, a lithium polymer energy storage cell, and a power management circuit (PMC), all contained within a 3D-printed package. The EWPT receiver and overall system are experimentally characterized using a 238 Hz sinusoidal magnetic charging field and either a 1000 µF electrolytic capacitor or a lithium polymer (LiPo) cell as the storage cell. The system demonstrates a minimal operating field as low as 50 µTrms (similar in magnitude to Earth’s magnetic field). At this minimum charging field, the prototype transfers a maximum dc current of 50 µA to the capacitor, corresponding to a power delivery of 118 µW. The power effectiveness of the power management system is approximately 49%; with power effectiveness defined as the ratio between actual output power and the maximum possible power the EWPT receiver can transfer to a pure resistive load at a given field strength.
  2. We report the design, fabrication, and experimental characterization of a chip-sized electromechanical micro-receiver for low-frequency, near-field wireless power transmission that employs both electrodynamic and piezoelectric transductions to achieve a high power density and high output voltage while maintaining a low profile. The 0.09 cm 3 device comprises a laser-micro-machined titanium suspension, one NdFeB magnet, two PZT-5A piezo-ceramic patches, and a precision-manufactured micro-coil with a thickness of only 1.65 mm. The device generates 520 μW average power (5.5 mW•cm -3 ) at 4 cm distance from a transmitter coil operating at 734.6 Hz and within safe human exposure limits. Compared to a previously reported piezoelectric-only prototype, this device generates ~2.5x higher power and offers 18% increased normalized power density (6.5 mW•cm -3 •mT -2 ) for potential improvement in wirelessly charging wearables and bio-implants.
  3. This paper presents the design, fabrication and experimental characterization of a chip-sized wireless power receiver for low-frequency electrodynamic wireless power transmission (EWPT). Utilizing a laser micro-machined meandering suspension, one NdFeB magnet, and two PZT-SA piezoelectric patches, this 0.08 cm 3 micro-receiver operates at its torsion mode mechanical resonance of 724 Hz. The device generates 360 μW average power (4.2 mWcm -3 power density) at 1 cm distance from a transmitter coil operating at 724 Hz and safely within allowable human exposure limits of 2 mTrms field. Compared to a previously reported macro-scale prototype, this volume-efficient micro-receiver is 31x smaller and offers 3.2x higher power density within a low-profile, compact footprint for wirelessly charging wearable and bio-implantable devices.
  4. The long-term aim of this work is to develop a biosensing system that rapidly detects bacterial targets of interest, such as Escherichia coli, in drinking and recreational water quality monitoring. For these applications, a standard sample size is 100 mL, which is quite large for magnetic separation microfluidic analysis platforms that typically function with <20 µL/s throughput. Here, we report the use of 1.5-µm-diameter magnetic microdisc to selectively tag target bacteria, and a high-throughput microfluidic device that can potentially isolate the magnetically tagged bacteria from 100 mL water samples in less than 15 min. Simulations and experiments show ~90% capture efficiencies of magnetic particles at flow rates up to 120 µL/s. Also, the platform enables the magnetic microdiscs/bacteria conjugates to be directly imaged, providing a path for quantitative assay.