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  1. Abstract

    HD 21997 is host to a prototypical “hybrid” debris disk characterized by debris disk-like dust properties and a CO gas mass comparable to a protoplanetary disk. We use Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite time series photometry to demonstrate that HD 21997 is a high-frequency delta Scuti pulsator. If the mode identification can be unambiguously determined in future works, an asteroseismic age of HD 21997 may become feasible.

     
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  2. Abstract

    The Galactic bulge is critical to our understanding of the Milky Way. However, due to the lack of reliable stellar distances, the structure and kinematics of the bulge/bar beyond the Galactic center have remained largely unexplored. Here, we present a method to measure distances of luminous red giants using a period–amplitude–luminosity relation anchored to the Large Magellanic Cloud, with random uncertainties of 10%–15% and systematic errors below 1%–2%. We apply this method to data from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment to measure distances to 190,302 stars in the Galactic bulge and beyond out to 20 kpc. Using this sample, we measure a distance to the Galactic center ofR0= 8108 ± 106stat± 93syspc, consistent with direct measurements of stars orbiting Sgr A*. We cross-match our distance catalog with Gaia DR3 and use the subset of 39,566 overlapping stars to provide the first constraints on the Milky Way’s velocity field (VR,Vϕ,Vz) beyond the Galactic center. We show that theVRquadrupole from the bar’s near side is reflected with respect to the Galactic center, indicating that the bar is bisymmetric and aligned with the inner disk. We also find that the vertical heightVZmap has no major structure in the region of the Galactic bulge, which is inconsistent with a current episode of bar buckling. Finally, we demonstrate withN-body simulations that distance uncertainty plays a factor in the alignment of the major and kinematic axes of the bar, necessitating caution when interpreting results for distant stars.

     
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  3. Abstract

    We analyzed 20 s cadence Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite time-series photometry of the exoplanet host star HR 8799 collected in Sector 56. The amplitude spectrum shows Gamma Doradus (γ Dor) pulsations consistent with previous space-based photometry from MOST. Assuming that HR 8799 is a representative ofγ Dor stars in the Kepler sample, the dominant dipole mode at 1.98 cycles day−1implies a core rotation period of ∼0.7 day, which combined withvsiniand stellar radius measurements would result in a preliminary stellar inclination of ∼28° assuming rigid rotation. We find no significant residual photometric variation after removing the pulsation signal aside from a ∼9 days trend that is likely a systematic effect or an artifact from performing aggressive frequency subtraction in the presence of red noise.

     
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  4. Abstract

    51 Eri is well known for hosting a directly imaged giant planet and for its membership to theβPictoris moving group. Using 2 minute cadence photometry from the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), we detect multiperiodic variability in 51 Eri that is consistent with pulsations of Gamma Doradus (γDor) stars. We identify the most significant pulsation modes (with frequencies between ∼0.5 and 3.9 cycles day−1and amplitudes ranging between ∼1 and 2 mmag) as dipole and quadrupole gravity modes, as well as Rossby modes, as previously observed in KeplerγDor stars. Our results demonstrate that previously reported variability attributed to stellar rotation is instead likely due toγDor pulsations. Using the mean frequency of the= 1 gravity modes, together with empirical trends of the KeplerγDor population, we estimate a plausible stellar core rotation period of0.90.1+0.3days for 51 Eri. We find no significant evidence for transiting companions around 51 Eri in the residual light curve. The detection ofγDor pulsations presented here, together with follow-up observations and modeling, may enable the determination of an asteroseismic age for this benchmark system. Future TESS observations would allow a constraint on the stellar core rotation rate, which in turn traces the surface rotation rate, and thus would help clarify whether or not the stellar equatorial plane and orbit of 51 Eri b are coplanar.

     
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  5. Abstract

    The bright starλSer hosts a hot Neptune with a minimum mass of 13.6Mand a 15.5 day orbit. It also appears to be a solar analog, with a mean rotation period of 25.8 days and surface differential rotation very similar to the Sun. We aim to characterize the fundamental properties of this system and constrain the evolutionary pathway that led to its present configuration. We detect solar-like oscillations in time series photometry from the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, and we derive precise asteroseismic properties from detailed modeling. We obtain new spectropolarimetric data, and we use them to reconstruct the large-scale magnetic field morphology. We reanalyze the complete time series of chromospheric activity measurements from the Mount Wilson Observatory, and we present new X-ray and ultraviolet observations from the Chandra and Hubble space telescopes. Finally, we use the updated observational constraints to assess the rotational history of the star and estimate the wind braking torque. We conclude that the remaining uncertainty on the stellar age currently prevents an unambiguous interpretation of the properties ofλSer, and that the rate of angular momentum loss appears to be higher than for other stars with a similar Rossby number. Future asteroseismic observations may help to improve the precision of the stellar age.

     
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  6. Abstract

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission searches for new exoplanets. The observing strategy of TESS results in high-precision photometry of millions of stars across the sky, allowing for detailed asteroseismic studies of individual systems. In this work, we present a detailed asteroseismic analysis of the giant star HD 76920 hosting a highly eccentric giant planet (e= 0.878) with an orbital period of 415 days, using five sectors of TESS light curve that cover around 140 days of data. Solar-like oscillations in HD 76920 are detected around 52μHz by TESS for the first time. By utilizing asteroseismic modeling that takes classical observational parameters and stellar oscillation frequencies as constraints, we determine improved measurements of the stellar mass (1.22 ± 0.11M), radius (8.68 ± 0.34R), and age (5.2 ± 1.4 Gyr). With the updated parameters of the host star, we update the semimajor axis and mass of the planet asa= 1.165 ± 0.035 au andMpsini=3.57±0.22MJup. With an orbital pericenter of 0.142 ± 0.005 au, we confirm that the planet is currently far away enough from the star to experience negligible tidal decay until being engulfed in the stellar envelope. We also confirm that this event will occur within about 100 Myr, depending on the stellar model used.

     
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  7. Abstract Asteroseismology of bright stars has become increasingly important as a method to determine the fundamental properties (in particular ages) of stars. The Kepler Space Telescope initiated a revolution by detecting oscillations in more than 500 main-sequence and subgiant stars. However, most Kepler stars are faint and therefore have limited constraints from independent methods such as long-baseline interferometry. Here we present the discovery of solar-like oscillations in α Men A, a naked-eye ( V = 5.1) G7 dwarf in TESS’s southern continuous viewing zone. Using a combination of astrometry, spectroscopy, and asteroseismology, we precisely characterize the solar analog α Men A ( T eff = 5569 ± 62 K, R ⋆ = 0.960 ± 0.016 R ⊙ , M ⋆ = 0.964 ± 0.045 M ⊙ ). To characterize the fully convective M dwarf companion, we derive empirical relations to estimate mass, radius, and temperature given the absolute Gaia magnitude and metallicity, yielding M ⋆ = 0.169 ± 0.006 M ⊙ , R ⋆ = 0.19 ± 0.01 R ⊙ , and T eff = 3054 ± 44 K. Our asteroseismic age of 6.2 ± 1.4 (stat) ± 0.6 (sys) Gyr for the primary places α Men B within a small population of M dwarfs with precisely measured ages. We combined multiple ground-based spectroscopy surveys to reveal an activity cycle of P = 13.1 ± 1.1 yr for α Men A, a period similar to that observed in the Sun. We used different gyrochronology models with the asteroseismic age to estimate a rotation period of ∼30 days for the primary. Alpha Men A is now the closest ( d = 10 pc) solar analog with a precise asteroseismic age from space-based photometry, making it a prime target for next-generation direct-imaging missions searching for true Earth analogs. 
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  8. null (Ed.)
    ABSTRACT The study of planet occurrence as a function of stellar mass is important for a better understanding of planet formation. Estimating stellar mass, especially in the red giant regime, is difficult. In particular, stellar masses of a sample of evolved planet-hosting stars based on spectroscopy and grid-based modelling have been put to question over the past decade with claims they were overestimated. Although efforts have been made in the past to reconcile this dispute using asteroseismology, results were inconclusive. In an attempt to resolve this controversy, we study four more evolved planet-hosting stars in this paper using asteroseismology, and we revisit previous results to make an informed study of the whole ensemble in a self-consistent way. For the four new stars, we measure their masses by locating their characteristic oscillation frequency, νmax, from their radial velocity time series observed by SONG. For two stars, we are also able to measure the large frequency separation, Δν, helped by extended SONG single-site and dual-site observations and new Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite observations. We establish the robustness of the νmax-only-based results by determining the stellar mass from Δν, and from both Δν and νmax. We then compare the seismic masses of the full ensemble of 16 stars with the spectroscopic masses from three different literature sources. We find an offset between the seismic and spectroscopic mass scales that is mass dependent, suggesting that the previously claimed overestimation of spectroscopic masses only affects stars more massive than about 1.6 M⊙. 
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